Neuroplasticity for Tinnitus – Joey Remenyi Rock Steady – #06

Joey Remenyi explains her new book called Rock Steady. Joey Remenyi is a neuroplasticity therapist and audiologist in Australia. She created Rock Steady to explain how to heal tinnitus and vertigo using neuroplasticity.

Joey Remenyi
There was a turning point for me when I started to realize, okay, nobody else can fix me. I can try all the doctors in the world and all the therapists in the world, but at the end of the day, they can’t fix me and they’re not helping me. And then something shifted in that I started to really enquire within myself and to use my background in neuroscience, psychology, Acceptance Commitment Therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and all of my yoga and neuro plasticity background. I started to actually experiment with changing my own brain and taking control of it and being the leader in my recovery.

Interview with Joey Remenyi author of Rock Steady

Ben Thompson, AuD
Hey guys, today we are here with Joey Remenyi, who is a colleague of mine, a friend and a mentor. She is a vestibular audiologist in Melbourne, Australia. And she’s here for a special event because in the recent times, she’s going to be releasing a book, a book that is based off of her program Rock Steady, which is a comprehensive approach to managing chronic symptoms, particularly vertigo, dizziness and tinnitus. So we’re bringing her on for the Pure Tinnitus Podcast to explain all the details about what she learned writing this book, and how it may help you with your symptoms. So with that, we welcome you, Joey, how are you doing today? And how is this whole process been with your book?

Joey Remenyi
Oh, thank you so much for having me. It’s, it’s really amazing. And it’s kind of interesting to hear you say it’s a book based on the program, because I feel like I did it a little bit backwards. I don’t think the books really based on the program, I think the book was something I always had to write. And indeed, my clients asked me to write it probably 10 years ago. But it’s just it’s such a body of knowledge. And it’s such a mammoth effort to put it together in one resource. And as you discover yourself, and in building an online program, it’s a lot more forgiving, you know, you can add pieces and take them away and try other things. And so the, the program almost became my apprenticeship of Okay, how can we get better quality resources to people with chronic symptoms of vertigo or tinnitus? And how can we get real feedback and real life situations that look at, okay, how can they skills and tools be implemented? How can they be useful, and the program really has the flexibility to chop and change and to move and to grow and to adapt. And the book is really a summary of that process and a summary of everything we’ve learnt and it doesn’t have the, I suppose the clunkiness initially that would be in in the prototype. So yeah, it’s like it’s like, it’s like a huge amount of learnings all put together in 10 chapters.

Ben Thompson, AuD
And once you make the book, and you publish, it is out there, it’s pretty rare to make edits to the original book. So that’s exciting, you must have put a lot of heart and a lot of energy into this book. So thank you, from all of us, I was able to get special access to the book to review it myself before it’s released. And we’ll explain details about how to get the book later. But one interesting thing we’re going to do today is that I took out some sections of the book that I that I thought it’d be fun for us to talk about that do relate to tinnitus, and that our audience may change their perspective about what you offer and the unique gifts that you’re bringing to this online tennis world. So first in the chapter, unwanted sensations, the passage that you wrote, described, in order to heal unwanted sensations and return to a sense of normal, you need to retrain your neural networks. This is something you can do with education, support and a methodical daily practice. Medication cannot change neurons for you. Neither can your family members, doctors, therapists, audiologists or psychologists, only you can change your neural maps. And you can learn to do this with a step by step process. So can you explain unwanted sensations and the typical experience for someone with tinnitus?

Joey Remenyi
Yeah, so if we take it right back to the senses, so we’re living in this amazing human body, and I feel like the older I get, the more or inspired I become of the human body because as a young woman, and young girl, I completely took it for granted, I just was out there living my life. But of course, we’ve got this body and we’ve got our five senses and the five senses. So touch, sight, taste, smell, and then the ear organs, the Hearing and Balance. These are what are allowing us to engage with the outer world. And it’s by sensing the outer world that we find our place and we find our belonging and we, we navigate what’s safe and what’s dangerous. So unwanted sensations refer to any kind of sensory input from those five senses that doesn’t match reality. And inclement in clinic we call that a sensory mismatch or some kind of distorted sensation and tinnitus fits into this unwanted sensation basket because We might be sitting outside with birds singing and Trey’s wrestling, but all we can hear is our body noise. So rather than hearing the birds singing and the trees rustling, which is like a normal real life appropriate sensory input, we can hear this roaring or buzzing or pulsing or tingling. And you know, we could give a long list of examples been, but you get the idea. So it says unwanted sound that doesn’t match the environment. And it’s very common for that to occur in bed early in the morning or late at night when we’re trying to do quiet meditation or quiet activities, where there’s no really robust noise that can drown it out or override it. So having unwanted sensations in our life can be highly debilitating. It can drive people literally mad, it can erode confidence and self esteem. It can ruin relationships, it’s this real, invisible kind of situation. And I suppose part of my mission in writing this book, is to help bring hope and accurate information back to people who are experiencing unwanted invisible disruptive sensations, because it can feel doom and gloom, it can feel like there’s no cure, I have to live with it forever. My life is over. You know, I’ll never live a full life again, because I’m dealing with this kind of broken body. That’s how it can feel. And that’s completely not the truth. And so a lot of my book was about saying Yes, okay, so we can have unwanted sensations, and they are neural pathways firing from our sensory system to our brain. And, and for some reason, we don’t always know why. But sometimes we can kind of pinpoint it back to a, an initial trigger. But for some reason, the brain is creating this inner sound, this tenant to sound or this unwanted sensation. It’s not helping me, it doesn’t make any sense. It’s not relevant, it’s freaking me out, it’s making me feel abnormal. This entire construct, belief system and sensory perception, we can actually change and rewire. I mean, that’s what my book is about. It’s about saying whatever sensations I have that don’t make sense to me, are not meaningful to me, and are not enabling me to live the fullest life that I want to live. I can actually go in and change those because it’s my brain. And the way I use my senses and interpret my senses, is actually something I am in control of my book explains why that’s sometimes not obvious. But how we can methodically go about resetting the software update in our system.

Ben Thompson, AuD
And this is personal for you. Because your journey started with your own life experiences, that holds so much weight for someone who is looking for hope through someone else who’s already gone through what they’re trying to achieve. How instrumental was that in writing your book?

Joey Remenyi
Well, it’s been a really interesting process to me psychologically, because in writing the book, and in doing these kind of interviews, I’m only just realizing like how much that played a role in motivating me because first and foremost, I was a yoga student, a yoga teacher and an audiologist. I was never first and foremost, a vertigo patient or attendances patient, that was never the identity that I clung to, or that I really associated with. But these were like very quiet, invisible battles. I was battling and not telling anyone, and I was shaming myself, and I didn’t like my body. And I was telling myself, I shouldn’t feel this, and I shouldn’t hear that, and I should be better, and it should be something else. So inside of myself very quietly. Well, it was loud in me, but nobody else noticed. I was experiencing this huge inner conflicts. And I think the major story going on, if I was to really just simplify it all down was I’m not good enough, I’m broken. And I eventually got, I got to a very low point. And I think I speak about this in the book. And that was a turning point for me when I started to realize, okay, nobody else can fix me. I can try all the doctors in the world and all the therapists in the world, but at the end of the day, they can’t fix me and they’re not helping me and I felt really did ended. And then something shifted in that I started to really enquire within myself and to use my background in neuroscience and psychology and acceptance, Commitment Therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy and all of my yoga and neuroplasticity background, I started to actually experiment with changing my own brain and taking control of it and being the leader in my recovery. And it was a slow and steady process. But sure enough, I completely reset myself back to normal. It is a physical, mental, emotional, spiritual process and it can be so subtle, and not necessarily slow, but definitely subtle. It can be so subtle that as the person going through it, we don’t even notice it until one day we realize, oh wow, I used to feel really awkward in a supermarket and now it’s Totally normal, we kind of get these contrasts. So anyway, in writing the book, and in doing these interviews and in kind of talking about my story, I’m realizing I was really my first client like I was a big deal. And my recovery really shaped the way I practice audiology and the way I take yoga knowledge, in particular pratyahara, which is, you know, looking at the inwardness of the senses, and making sure that our sensory input doesn’t control us with cravings and sex, drugs and rock’n’roll. So there’s a whole chapter in yoga on sensory input and mastering our senses. These kind of areas started to become my professional focus. And I think I have so much conviction about neuroplasticity in such a deep knowing it’s not even a belief system. It’s like this is this is science. This is real. And because I’ve gone through it, and I’ve actually played with making my sounds louder or making my son softer, and I’ve, I’ve actually really used it. There’s, there’s a deep knowing and deep conviction that you know this, we need to talk about this more. It’s like it’s not no one’s talking about it. Why is nobody talking about it? why there’s so many people out there feeling stuck and feeling abandoned by the system and feeling overmedicated when there is a whole new way of recovery based on traditional practices. And why is no one having this conversation. And I was talking to a lot of elite scientists and neuroscientists, psychologists, audiologists, the nose and throat surgeon, psychiatrists, neurologists, and no one was particularly interested in it. And they were kind of interested, like, you know, enough, a polite chitchat, but no one was really interested in the subject matter, I guess, because no one that I had met was really studying it and really into it. And I think it probably took somebody like me with a natural interest in yoga and a natural interest in neuroscience. And then, of course, the experience of feeling deeply anxious and depressed myself with unwanted sensations. For me, it was vestibular migraine, bppv, and tinnitus. And so having that personal investment in the results, of course, is going to motivate me to learn more about it. So it’s, it’s really very central, I didn’t really I had no idea how much my personal experience was central to my practice.

Ben Thompson, AuD
And you touched on the desired sensation of feeling normal. And in the chapter called learning to use neuroplasticity, you explain how one of the biggest traps that you see in clients with persistent symptoms is that they have unrealistic expectations of themselves. They want to feel, quote, unquote, normal all the time. And they want this normal feeling to happen naturally, without any effort on their part. They may judge themselves as being abnormal, if they feel low, ill or distressed, they avoid feeling and don’t like being in their bodies, they develop a host of distractions and avoidance behaviors in life so that they never really have to feel at all. Of course, we all have distractions in our lives. And we all want to be living a comfortable, safe, normal life. So what is a realistic expectation for managing chronic tinnitus? And what’s a good goal to have to develop some sense of normal?

Joey Remenyi
First of all, I just want to say that is really common, like that story I just painted there in the book. I was there, like, there was times when I was there. And I would wake up every day with this dread in my body being like, I’m not happy, I’m not connected. I’m not. I didn’t have zest for life, like there was a dread, there was just this awful feeling. And I judged myself for that, instead of sitting back and being like, you know what, you’re in your mid 20s, or your late 20s. And life is changing. And it’s normal to go through these times in life, these challenges. And these changes have chapters when we do feel like the rugs pulled from underneath us. And it’s okay to go through periods of duress and difficulty. And moving through that and having the skills to move through that and normalize that is actually really adult and really compassionate. But you know, when I was in it, I was really judging myself, I didn’t want to feel what I was feeling. I didn’t want to hear what I was hearing in my body. I didn’t want to, I just wanted to be happy, normal and perfect, like everybody supposedly on the front covers of magazines, right? You know, it’s that whole confusing stereotype that we’re fed. So, first of all, I don’t really use language like managing symptoms, you know, that’s not what I’m about. I’m about actually totally reclaiming the body and developing a new sense of normal and completely overcoming symptoms. So for me managing symptoms is is not my job. And that’s definitely not a goal I would ever set a client. And the book I think really drives home the message if our focus is on symptoms, whether it be managing symptoms or getting rid of symptoms, you just get more of them because by Focusing on symptoms, we teach the brain to make them louder and to allocate more neural activity and more neural maps and more neural firing and more signups is dedicated to symptoms. So, desired sensations and desiring a new sense of normal could look more like this rather than I’m managing my tinnitus, or I’m getting rid of my tinnitus using neuroplasticity, like that doesn’t work. It would look something like this. I want to feel connected to my body, therefore finding ways to truly authentically genuinely feel connected in my body. That’s going to become my daily practice, I’m going to find things that helped me fire, the neural patterns of connectedness, I want to feel peace, I want to feel inner peace, I want to feel contentment, these are my normal, I want to feel relaxed, I want to feel at ease. So we might just start with with one design sensation, we might start with four or five design sensations, it doesn’t matter. But we actually begin to methodically explore Well, how do I feel at ease in my body? What can I do? What can I say? What beliefs would help me feel more at ease in my body. And this is where it becomes more of a physical, mental, emotional, spiritual process of integrated neuroplasticity, and really self discovery. It’s not an exercise regime, it’s not going to the gym. It’s not repeating random prescriptions three times a day, it really is an exploration and every day, we need different things. And I think the great unrealistic expectation dilemma is in feeling like oh, well, I just used to be happy all the time as younger kids, so why aren’t I just happy all the time now. And now that I’m a mother of an eight month old baby, it’s like, he’s happy putting anything in his mouth doesn’t matter where he is what he’s doing, if he can just find something to put it in his mouth, he will happily munching away all day long. And the reality is, is the things that used to please us when we were younger people may not please us anymore, you know, that’s not gonna make me happy, just putting stuff in my mouth all day. So as we grow, and as we evolve, we have to actually move with this natural sense of order and curiosity and discovering of the world. So when I was a younger girl, maybe it was baseball, and it was sport, and it was certain music or fashion, whatever. And I’ve outgrown that. So we’re constantly having to get to know ourselves. And this is where it takes effort. It actually takes self discovery, it takes a willingness to let go and, and almost parts of us die away and new parts of us are reborn, and it’s this refreshing. We’re constantly refreshing our internal settings. And that’s how we stay in alignment with our values. That’s how we stay connected to our design sensations. And that’s how we begin to actually figure out what is a meaningful life? What is a connected life? What am I doing on this planet? And I think it’s a bit of a lofty, long winded answer, I’m sorry, but it’s like we get caught up in just being this person we think we should be even when we outgrow that person and it doesn’t make us happy anymore. And then we kind of shame ourselves because we’re not staying stuck in this one. space we think we should remain in so it I think it’s it really begs us to grow neuro plasticity really begs us to use loving compassion, loving kindness and to to grow and to be the best version of ourselves we can in any given moment.

Ben Thompson, AuD
Absolutely, I think your story here is an important aspect where there’s a symptom or of ringing in the ear that starts someone on this long journey and the results they get at the end or the gifts or the lessons they learn, they would have never expected at the beginning. I want to shift a little bit to talk about habituation, neuroplasticity, and silence because these are common terms that we throw around as therapists and people are seeing on the internet as well. So in your chapter called understanding tinnitus, you explain how much of our tinnitus noise is neural coming from the nerves, which means it’s carried by messages being sent along neuron pathways, and interpreted as meaningful and important. So the brain makes it louder for us, the brain will filter the noise out once we stop focusing on it. This is the neuroplasticity healing component. The noise is always there, but we train the brain not to worry about it or exacerbate it. So again, for someone who has seen the term neuroplasticity, and they have curiosity, and then they’ve learned the term habituation, also curiosity. And then maybe they’ve heard some people describe silence being the goal. So how do you make sense of all this?

Joey Remenyi
Yeah, that’s a great question. Well, first of all, I think it’s a really unique and personal journey and silence is a construct that we invent for ourselves. Silence doesn’t actually exist. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world. Down at the beach at a rain forest in a soundproof booth. in your bedroom, in your lounge room, there’s always white noise, there’s always sound vibration moving around us. And as human beings just a little bit like when you turn the car on and your car makes an idle sound. And you know, when it’s changing gears and things this sounds mechanically made, the human body is also making sound. So as long as we’re alive, there’s going to be sounds generated. So silence doesn’t exist. Silence is something we create for ourselves. It’s an idea. And the beauty of that is we create it right? So if we lose it, we can also create it. So, silences is something we can play with and toy with, and I think often will get access to silence. So silence is the result of neural firing patterns firing and being interpreted meaningfully in the brain as silence, okay. Just as our conversation right now is arriving through the podcast, or through YouTube or through Facebook, and no sound waves are arriving at people’s ears as a meaningful conversation between Joey and Ben. So the the meaning making happens in the brain. And so we we teach the brain how to create silence. I think habituation is really just scientific jargon, which is talking about when my favorite example is I went to visit friends for dinner one night, and it was in the city and I live in a quiet a coastal village town, where there’s not so much traffic, but they lived really close to a train station, and it blew me over it was like How the hell can you live so close to this enormous train sounds like all the time these trains coming through, and it was it was really full on, you know, and so I didn’t say anything or make a big deal of it. But I was just thinking, like, how could they sleep? How can they concentrate. And then sure enough, you know, we’re enjoying the meal, were chatting with fully engaged, and I noticed towards the end of the night, I no longer notice the trains, the trains were still coming. But I’d habituated to it, which meant my brain had made the executive decision that I was enjoying the compensation, I was enjoying the meal, I was enjoying my friends and the connection. That was where my brain was putting the neural emphasis, because that was what was lighting me up and making me happy. And bringing me closer to that goal of connection, which is my desired normal sensation. And the trains passing was unhelpful, irrelevant and meaningful, there was, there was no need for my brain to waste precious life energy on amplifying that signal. So even though the signal was still there, I’d habituated to it automatically. Because I was so focused on connecting to my friends. So I hope that kind of helps kind of paint the picture in a really normal, ordinary life circumstances. All of them involve neuroplasticity. habituation is a word that I think people can use, if they want to use I don’t need to use it. It’s kind of jargon. And silence is something we create when we want to create it. And I think it takes deep self exploration, it’s a journey. If I can use that term, it’s nonlinear. It’s not a linear process. And I think it’s something to get excited about. Because if silence is something you’re missing in your life, and something you really want to recreate, well, this is an exciting moment for you to say, Okay, I’m going to invent it, I’m going to make it up. I’m going to use my creative license, because it’s my inner world, and I’m in charge of my inner world. And the way my brain interprets sensory input is my choice. And so I think just really giving the power back and shifting the way we view our bodies and the way we view our miraculous brain really gives us permission to play with our senses, which is so yogic that this is the fun stuff in yoga. We’re playing with how we’re we’re receiving input and what we’re doing with that input. It’s this great exploration.

Ben Thompson, AuD
Thank you so much. Yeah, for anyone who’s listening, we’re talking about Joey remedies, new book, Rocksteady, and in just a few minutes, we’re going to describe how you can get access to it. But before then, I have one last passage because just this past weekend, I was hanging out with some friends, we were going on our river trip, and I read some of your book, and I took the passages that I felt will be fun to talk about here with our audience. So from the chapter riding the rollercoaster and finding the gift you describe. reaching a point of healing or recovery doesn’t mean that you get an easy asymptomatic or flawless ride for the rest of your life. It means life keeps changing around you and you keep up with it. As you also continue changing within yourself. No matter what you feel on any given day. You feel whole complete and supported. You know that you can handle any passings sensation that in each moment you are okay? Once your healing kicks in, you are okay with who you are and what life brings you. You no longer wake up with dread about symptoms or lose sleep over it. You are at peace with your body sounds and sensations as they intermittently present themselves in your life. So what can someone expect with this roller coaster long term and with their tinnitus? Joy?

Joey Remenyi
Well, I guess what I’m saying is, people just go back to living a full and joyful life and many of my clients and myself included, we don’t hear it anymore. It’s filtered out because the brains decided that tinnitus noise is not meaningful. It’s not enriching, it’s not emphasized. And so where my brain used to put neural energy in the tinnitus sounds and making them alive and making them reach my frontal awareness so that I can always hear it. That energy is being diverted elsewhere into other areas of my life where I’ve decided I want to place more emphasis. So it’s like, I’m hijacking that neuro input. And same with my clients, and myself as well often. So we don’t hear the tinnitus anymore. It’s no longer taking us over. It’s not a part of our daily life. But there can be moments when it’s like, oh, you know, my, my partner has just been diagnosed with a difficult condition, or I’ve just been made redundant in my job or whatever. Like, there’s these things happen in life, and then the noises can come back because we’ve got a new flush of stress hormones and perhaps sleeplessness and worries and anxieties. And as that happens, we just realized, okay, this is normal, this is my body processing something difficult. I don’t have to go down back that road of feeling abnormal with tinnitus, I can welcome in the passing changes to my sensory world, which can include sounds that can include all sorts of sensations. And I can listen to them, I can use them, I can find the gift I can support myself and I can renormalize and come back to my desired normal much more quickly. So the the analogy is kind of like flying from from London to New York, the aeroplanes no going like off on these random adventures past the Bahamas or doing a little side trip to Sydney. It’s it’s micro navigating from London to New York, and it’s slightly off track, and then a slightly on track, again, slightly off path, and then it’s back on path. And I think it’s the same with humans. And when we feel these unwanted sensations, whatever they are, whether they’re sounds, or you know, prickly feelings in our skin, or funny smells, or funny, dizziness and vertigo sensations, it’s in some way, shape and form, it’s the body losing balance. So at some physical, mental, emotional or spiritual level, the body’s going, something’s not right, you know, we’re a little off path. When we can listen to that and get the early warning signs, it’s very mild, and we come back on track quickly, and we feel normal more often. So I think the idea would be to expect to feel normal and to normalize the roller coaster, rather than to expect the flatline.

Ben Thompson, AuD
Yeah, and what you’re saying is key as well, when when I noticed that I’m getting off track or off of my center, that’s a good thing, because that’s the first way that’s the first part of what’s going to actually bring it back first I have to know is happening. And then I learned how to bring it back. So that that’s actually empowering, right.

Joey Remenyi
And, and also learning to do that, from a place of deep love and deep compassion and deep all things really shifted for me when I started to really view the human body, myself included with all like a web. And it really shifted me from that date place of self judgment, self rejection, self critic, which are normal steps along the path. And I’m sure many of my readers will totally resonate with the the inner critic and the self rejection and lack of self acceptance and the lack of self love. But these are all things we can learn and build. And it’s so enriching. And it completely changes the chemical cocktails that are released in our brain. When we access compassion in new ways, embodied ways. We change the chemicals that are released in our body, and it feels amazing. And that feeling is the reward. And that’s where a lot of my neuroplasticity clients, the reward is feeling it because it’s a feeling process. And as we practice feeling, what we want to feel, we feel what we want to feel more often, and that’s the reward. So we keep doing it. It’s a self rewarding process. And as you were touching upon before many of my clients will say they come out of this debacle, feeling much more connected to themselves a lot more self love, self acceptance, self compassion, and ultimately able to contribute to the world in new and wonderful ways because they’ve got more confidence. And so it’s almost like they’re not the person who they were before the tinnitus or before the vertigo. But they’ve turned into This kind of better version of themselves, where they really supersize themselves with with love and compassion and kindness and humanity. So it’s a really beautiful process.

Ben Thompson, AuD
I completely agree that that is the silver lining is that the condition of tinnitus can impact and improve your life in a holistic way, far more than just that auditory symptom. I want to share that it was about two years ago, when I started to fully research what kind of online tinnitus resources were out there. And I came across your YouTube channel and started following you. And I reached out and we communicated a little bit. And now about two years later, after starting pure tennis, I’m bringing you here on to showcase your book on this pure tennis podcast. So for me in a way, this is very full circle. And I’m honored to be to be your colleague, and to see you released this book, which I know will help many people. So that leads me to the question. For anyone who’s still listening, who’s still watching, and I will include any links you provide me in the description of the videos, or the audio, how can someone find your book? And how can someone follow your work?

Joey Remenyi
Great, I think visit my website seeking balanced comm.au the book is just about to be released. So end of October will open for pre orders. And the official book launch is mid November. If you get to listen to this before then join my book launch party, it’s going to be on zoom, and you’re all welcome. But the book will be available to any online major book retailer, whether that’s Amazon or fish pond, or booktopia. I think we’ve got like a huge list of places people can purchase the books online. And yeah, there’ll be an E book version or a paperback. And the books really designed to be like a best friend. For someone with these conditions. It’s it’s a book you’ll probably want to reread. Have it nearby to refer to and difficult moments or in times when you need a little reminder. There’s a bunch of really beautiful home exercises to try. So you can develop your own neuroplasticity practice and summary points as well. So you can get a little recap of what what you may have learned in one chapter. And yeah, we tried to make the book very easy to use and easy to follow. Because we wanted to be sensitive to people who actually had active sensory distortions and reading a book can just feel overwhelming. So we tried to make it like a bit of a best friend. So I hope it helps many, many, many people.

Ben Thompson, AuD
Yeah, thank you so much. And this is a great way to have your guidance in someone’s bookshelf in their home at an affordable price. Because you’re a new mother, you own your own online therapy and neuroplasticity business, you’re obviously very busy woman. So one on one time with you, I imagine is very hard. So having this book is a great resource. So thank you for providing it. See, and just to confirm seeking balance.com.au correct?

Joey Remenyi
Yeah, from my website, you’ll be able to learn all about what I do what I offer. And if you if you listen to this in the pre order period, I’m giving away heaps of really exciting free giveaways for people who do pre order the book. I was saying to Ben earlier, when he writes a book, I’ll help him promote his pre order, because it’s really important that people back the book, and that we get a really loud kind of initial input out into the market, because that helps more and more people find it. And I think this conversation is all about changing culture. And we want people down the road and in a few years time to have a completely different experience of tinnitus. We want them to hear really soon, really early on in their diagnostic process. You can reverse this, this is reversible. And this is the path you can take. And that’s the piece I’m hoping my book will help bridge because I think a lot of people are experiencing too much doom and gloom and it’s it’s not okay, we need to do better. Yeah, as professionals we need to do better.

Ben Thompson, AuD
Absolutely. I wholly agree. Thank you so much for being here. Joey. Check this link to access Joey’s work.

Dr. Ben Thompson, Au.D.

Dr. Ben Thompson, Au.D.

Dr. Ben Thompson is an audiologist in California and founder of Pure Tinnitus. Dr. Thompson has a comprehensive knowledge of tinnitus management. He completed his residency at University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) and is a past board member of the California Academy of Audiology. Via telehealth, Dr. Thompson provides services to patients with hearing loss and tinnitus.

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